extremely long-life photochromic dye formulation Products

Extensive QUV testing at ISO and ASTM test standards laboratories has revealed that our proprietary formulation of DynaTint® photodynamic window tint film is not susceptible to degradation over any appreciable time frames for the usual long-life, industry acceptable standards of commercial window tint films and other product applications, such as polymer embedding or coating.


As of July, 2013 we now do our own in-house ASTM G-154 lab tests on Q-Labs QUV accelerated weathering testers, Beckman UV/Vis spectrophotometers and a Nicolet FTIR spectrometer and microscope.


Custom window film tint color formulations (not the actual film itself) will be available in September 2013.


December 2013 update: We have just finished successful lab quality samples of our DynaTint® dye formulation being run through a Thermo-Scientific lab-quality film extruder using both PET and Polycarbonate resins. The extruded films are clear until exposure to UV light which turns the film to its intended color and density. This research was done at Case Institute of Technology, Case Western Reserve university in Cleveland, OH over a five-day period. Our successful dye formulation has now been proven to survive the extreme temperatures and pressures encountered in extrusion processing of over 250 degrees C.


September 2014 update: We are continuing to prove our longevity claims with various major product manufacturers/custom-coaters in extensive, on-going laboratory testings at their R&D facilities.We are also working collaboratively to further improve are capabilities and offerings in these myriad applications.


Research is currently being conducted in the making of military-grade camouflage fabrics which blend in with surrounding UV sunlight exposure conditions, or the lack thereof.


ANTI-YELLOWING EFFECT IN POLYSTYRENE POLYMERS

As spin-off technology from our photochromic longevity research, we have come to find that we have the ability to delay the onset of yellowing occurring in polystyrene by a factor of 50% in time. Once a trace of yellowing does eventually set in, it is minimal and grows over time at a minimal, and almost undetectable, rate. We have reason to believe that this stabilization process may also apply to other (untested) clear polymers beyond polystyrene.


NEW TECHNOLOGY DISCOVERED TO FORESTALL THE ONSET OF YELLOWING IN CLEAR POLYSTYRENE (and Possibly Other Clear Polymers and Acrylics)

BY A TIME FACTOR OF AT LEAST 50%

A marketing push has begun to introduce this technology to major polymer resin manufacturers.









research

DynaTint Corporation, LLC